Post Nasel Drip Breath Post

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Post-nasal drip (PND), also known as Upper Airway Cough Syndrome (UACS), occurs when excessive mucus is produced by the nasal mucosa. The excess mucus accumulates in the throat or back of the nose. It can be caused by rhinitis (allergic or non-allergic), sinusitis (acute or chronic), laryngopharyngeal acid reflux (with or without heartburn), or by a disorder of swallowing (such as an esophageal motility disorder). It is frequently caused by allergies, which may be seasonal or persistent through the year. Birth control pills or pregnancy can also cause post-nasal drip because of the elevated levels of estrogen hormones.[citation needed]

(), also known as (), occurs when excessive is produced by the nasal . The excess mucus accumulates in the or back of the . It can be caused by (allergic or non-allergic), (acute or chronic), (with or without heartburn), or by a disorder of swallowing (such as an esophageal motility disorder). It is frequently caused by , which may be seasonal or persistent through the year. Birth control pills or pregnancy can also cause post-nasal drip because of the elevated levels of estrogen hormones.

Associated conditions

PND can cause a feeling of fullness within the stomach. PND may be, in some cases, a contributing cause for halitosis.[1]

Symptoms

An individual may be diagnosed as suffering from post-nasal drip if they suffer from the following symptoms:

  • Coughing
  • Wheezing (a more common source of wheezing than asthma)
  • Constant swallowing
  • Rhinorrhea, running nose due to mucus flow
  • Frequent spitting
  • Tickling in the throat
  • Constant clearing of throat
  • Rigid burning sensation at back of the throat
  • Broken or cracking voice
  • Mucus feeling in the back of the throat
  • Difficulty in breathing
  • Congestion in the nasal and sinus passages
  • Chronic sore throat
  • Masses formed in the crypts of the tonsils that are generally yellow or white (commonly called tonsil stones, or tonsilloliths)
  • Halitosis (bad breath)
  • Snorting to clear mucus from the nasal passage that cannot otherwise be cleared by blowing one's nose
  • Cobblestone appearance of the oropharyngeal mucosa

Treatment

First and foremost, as the causes are manifold, a removal of those causes should be aimed for. (E.g. in the case of acid reflux, treating the acid reflux would also cause the mucus to go away).
Treatment may include antibiotics, decongestants, nasal irrigation, acid control medication, allergy medication, and/or minor surgery.
Bulb syringes, squirt bottles, pulsatile nasal irrigator or neti pots nasopure are often used for nasal irrigation.

Allergy medications include antihistamines, decongestants, nasal steroids, nasal crolom, or combinations of these. Allergy injections may be used for long term relief when allergy is the cause. Oral steroids may be prescribed for short-term use.

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